April 10, 2019

Digital clothing will become your next go to purchase

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Digital clothing is fashion’s next, and potentially very lucrative, frontier. We already spend ample time online, to a point where our digital identities have taken a life of their own.

We now have fully digital celebrities that followers can engage and share with, blurring today’s physical and online worlds altogether. However, digital clothing is no longer limited to 3D renderings as Scandinavian retailer Carlings continues to demonstrate. The company sold digital clothing which buyers could “wear” via a picture they submitted, with prices reaching a maximum of EUR 30. A steep price for something that doesn’t exist in the physical world? Perhaps, but experts believe this is simply the beginning, and we’ll soon see others join in.

Digital clothing is here to stay

Even though one may not appreciate its importance, digital clothing helps humans create a fashion portfolio without impacting the environment. In an era where fast fashion has become public enemy #1, thrift stores are increasingly popular, and families are reducing their closet space (thanks Marie), these virtual items can fill a market void. In short, this form of clothing can:

  • Massively reduce environmental impact
  • Create new forms of scarcity for consumers
  • Enable new creators to tell their story without the need of an established brand
  • Create new jobs within the fashion industry

The beauty of virtual goods is that they do not depreciate over time, will be traceable if sold to someone else (tracked through blockchain) and can be almost unique when supply is limited by a developer. You won’t see everyone rocking the same digital clothing online, unlike what you might see in the physical world instead (including fakes). Ultimately, it enables greater creativity and self expression, but also potentially reduces judgement and bullying that people experience when sharing online. As such, the digital nature of the experience creates a potential wall of anonymity and safety that users will benefit from.

Cost and talent challenges

As a nascent field, digital clothing still has a lot of quirks. For starters, there are still very few people with proper 3D experience and credentials to make this more prevalent. It’s also expensive: The Fabricant, a digital fashion house, requires EUR 25,000 and six weeks to produce a small capsule. As things progress, companies will need to improve scalability and speed.

Can the value of fashion offline be replicated online?

Fashion maintains several key traits. In its most successful form, it captures cultural relevancy, tribalism, and identity. In an online environment, the places of interaction change. They’re often locked into platforms. Think Fortnite or NBA 2K. In these worlds, you can easily acquire exclusive items and in term create value for yourself in relation to your peers. But if there’s a lack of interoperability and the opportunity to bring these fashion items into other worlds, they’re fundamentally limited. The counterpoint is that in the future, if a Fortnite item is in a kid’s wallet and somebody is willing to transact some series currency for it, it doesn’t really matter. The on/off-ramps in the form of digital payments will find a way to figure itself out.

Regardless of the exact outcome, this is becoming another fascinating intersection where creativity and tech can combine to create new experiences for humans. Clothing, often bound by physical limits, will be unleashed through these new 3D models and systems. Time for you to build your online persona and get ready to steal the show online.

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